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Not My Client, Not My Problem. The Duty of Attorney’s to Non-Clients

By: Daniel Quinn

St. John’s Law Student

American Bankruptcy Institute Law Review Staff

In 2015, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit found that attorneys at May-er Brown, LLP had inadvertently terminated certain liens granted by General Motors (“GM”) in favor of J.P. Morgan Chase (“JPM”). GM repaid the Term Loan agreement in full in accordance with the bankruptcy court order and therefore made the retirement plaintiffs and Term Loan members subject to clawback provisions under the Bankruptcy Code. The members of the Term Loan agreement and retirement plaintiffs filed a lawsuit against Mayer Brown, the law firm responsible for the erroneous termination of liens, for negligent mis-representation and legal malpractice in the United States District Court of Northern District of Illinois.

Debtor’s Bankruptcy Filing Serves to Limit Creditor’s Liability to Third Parties

By: Ryan Dolan

St. John’s Law Student

American Bankruptcy Institute Law Review Staff

In Ritchie Capital Structure Management Trading, LTD., v. General Electric Capital Corporation, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit held that investors in a debtor’s Ponzi scheme did not have standing to sue the debtor’s lender.

Actual Knowledge Bars Section 546(e) Safe Harbor Defense

By: Amanda Tersigni

St. John’s Law Student

American Bankruptcy Institute Law Review, Staff

Section 546(e) of the Bankruptcy Code generally provides that a trustee may not avoid a “settlement payment” as a preference or a fraudulent transfer.[1] This so-called “safe harbor,” a defense to a trustee’s avoidance power, is designed to avoid uncertainty in security trading and to prevent an ultimate instability in the financial markets.[2] The United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York in Picard v. Avellino (In re Bernard L. Madoff Inv. Sec. LLC),[3] held that having actual knowledge of fraudulent nature of a security trading precluded a defendant from using the safe harbor defense under Section 546(e).[4]

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