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Maybe the U.K. was the Proper Forum After All

By: Tyler Levine

St. John’s Law Student

American Bankruptcy Institute Law Review Staff

In In re Hellas[1] the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York stayed an adversary proceeding on the ground of forum non-conveniens.[2] Plaintiffs, the [liquidators of] Hellas Telecommunications (Luxembourg) II SCA (“Hellas II”), filed a complaint in the Bankruptcy Court following recognition of the foreign liquidators of Hellas II under Chapter 15 of the Bankruptcy Code. The plaintiffs sought to avoid and recover an initial transfer from Hellas II to its parent’s entity of approximately $1.57 billion and also to avoid and recover $973.7 million that was later transferred to several named defendants and an unmanned class of transferees.[3] Initially, the court denied the forum non-conveniens motion because it had the jurisdiction to adjudicate the claims under Sections 213 and 423 of the U.K. Insolvency Act.[4] Thereafter, plaintiffs commenced a similar action under U.K. law, in the U.K., against nine dismissed defendants.[5] In response to this new avoidance action filed in the U.K., the defendants filed another forum non-conveniens motion on January 19, 2016, and the court concluded that in light of this new U.K. action it is now best to litigate all the claims in one forum.

Bankruptcy Plan Record Date Trumps FINRA Ex-Date

By: Derek Piersiak

St. John’s Law Student

American Bankruptcy Institute Law Review Staff

In In re: Arctic Glacier International, Inc v. Arctic Glacier Income Fund, the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware ruled that distributions would be made to unitholders as of the bankruptcy plan’s “Unitholder Distribution Record Date,” and not to the persons who held the units as of FINRA’s ex-date, which fell after the record date.[1] The ex-date is the date on and after which a security is traded without a specific dividend or distribution.[2] Under Arctic Glacier’s reorganization plan, “any distribution, no matter its size, must be made to those who [held] units as of the Unitholder Distribution Record Date, which must be at least 21 days prior to the date on which the distribution is actually paid out, i.e., the payable date.”[3] The plaintiffs purchased units after the plan’s record date.[4] When Arctic Glacier made distributions to those who held units as of the record date, the plaintiffs sued Arctic Glacier, alleging that under U.S. securities laws, Arctic Glacier should have made distributions to the plaintiffs.[5]

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